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By Family Foot Care
October 09, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Foot and ankle problems usually fall into the following categories:

  • Acquired from improper footwear, physical stress, or small mechanical changes within the foot.
  • Arthritic foot problems, which typically involve one or more joints.
  • Congenital foot problems, which occur at birth and are generally inherited.
  • Infectious foot problems, which are caused by bacterial, viral, or fungal problems.
  • Neoplastic disorders, also known as  tumors, which are the result of abnormal growth of tissue anywhere on the foot and may be benign or malignant.
  • Traumatic foot problems, which are associated with foot and ankle injuries, such as fractures.

Leading foot problems are:

  • Bunions—misaligned big toe joints that swell and become tender, causing the first joint of the big toe to slant outward and the second joint to angle toward the other toes. Bunions tend to be hereditary, but can be aggravated by shoes that are too narrow in the forefoot and toe. Surgery is frequently performed to correct the problem.
  • Hammertoes—usually stemming from muscle imbalance, this condition occurs when the toe is bent into a claw-like position. Hammertoe can affect any toe, but most frequently occurs to the second toe, when a bunion slants the big toe toward and under it. Selecting shoes and socks that do not cramp the toes may help alleviate any aggravation of pain or discomfort.
  • Heel Spurs—growths of bone on the underside, forepart of the heel bone. Heel spurs occur when the plantar tendon pulls at its attachment to the heel bone. This area of the heel later calcifies to form a spur. Proper warm-up and the use of appropriate athletic shoes can reduce the strain to the ligament and prevent the formation of heel spurs.
  • Ingrown Toenails—toenails with corners or sides that dig painfully into the skin. Ingrown toenails are usually caused by improper nail trimming, but can also result from shoe pressure, injury, fungus infection, heredity, and poor foot structure. Women are more likely to have ingrown toenails than men. The problem can be prevented by trimming toenails straight across, selecting proper shoe styles and sizes, and responding to foot pain in a timely manner.
  • Neuromas—enlarged benign growths of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from ill-fitting shoes or abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Depending on the severity, treatments may include orthotics (shoe inserts), cortisone injections, and, in extreme cases, surgical removal of the growth.
  • Plantar Fasciitis—an inflammation on the bottom of the foot that leads to heel and/or arch pain. A variety of foot injuries or improper foot mechanics can lead to plantar fasciitis. Treatments range from icing and foot exercises to the prescription of custom orthotics to correct the foot position and help alleviate pain.
  • Sesamoiditis—an inflammation or rupture of the two small bones (known as sesamoids) under the first metatarsal bone. Proper shoe selection and orthotics can help.
  • Shin Splints—pain on either side of the leg bone caused by muscle or tendon inflammation. Shin splints are related to excessive foot pronation, but also may be related to a muscle imbalance between opposing muscle groups in the leg. Proper stretching before and after exercise and corrective orthotics for pronation can help prevent shin splints.
  • Stress Fractures—incomplete cracks in bone caused by overuse. With complete rest, stress fractures in toes or any bones of the foot heal quickly. Extra padding in shoes can help prevent the condition. Left untreated, stress fractures may become complete bone fractures, which require casting and immobilization.
By Family Foot Care
July 02, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Bunions  

What is a Bunion?

A bunion is described as a bump on the side of the big toe. The bump actually reflects a change in the bony framework of the front part of the foot. The big toe leans toward the second toe, rather than pointing straight. This throws the bones out of alignment, creating the bunion’s bump. Bunions are a progressive disorder and will usually get worse over time.

What causes a Bunion?

Bunions are most often caused by an inherited faulty mechanical structure of the foot. It is not the bunion itself that is inherited but certain foot types that make a person prone to developing a bunion. Wearing shoes with a narrow toe box will sometimes make the deformity get progressive worse

What are symptoms of a Bunion?

Symptoms at the site of the bunion include pain or soreness, inflammation and redness, skin irritation, a burning sensation at the bunion site and possible numbness,

What are surgical treatments for a Bunion?

The surgical techniques below may be a choice to correct a bunion deformity.

Head Chevron osteotomy:

The first metatarsal bone is cut. Its head is moved closer to the second metatarsal bone. A screw or pin can be used to hold the first metatarsal bone in position. The bony bump is also removed. To protect your foot, a surgical shoe or boot is worn for a few weeks.

Base Osteotomy:

With this procedure, a wedge of bone is removed from the first metatarsal bone, farther back than in the head chevron osteotomy. The bony bump is also removed. To heal correctly, your foot may be placed in the cast or cast boot. You may be asked not to bear weight on the surgery foot for a few weeks.

Fusion or removal of part of the joint: 

This is typically done if there is arthritis that has damaged the joint itself.

 

By Family Foot Care
November 02, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Arthritis  

Arthritis in the Foot

Degenerative arthritis is a condition that slowly wears away joints (the link where bones meet and move). In the beginning, you may notice that the affected joint seems stiff. It may even ache. As the joint lining (cartilage) breaks down, the bones rub against each other, causing pain and swelling. Over time, bone spurs (small pieces of rough or splinter bone) develop, and the joint's range of motion becomes limited. But the movement doesn't have to cause pain. The effects of arthritis can be reduced. 

The Big-Toe Joint

When arthritis affects your big toe, your foot hurts when it pushes off the ground. Arthritis often appears in the big-toe joint along with a bunion (a bony bump at the side of the joint) or a bone spur on top of the joint.

Other Joints

When arthritis affects the rear or midfoot joints, you feel pain when you put weight on your foot. Arthritis may affect the joint where the ankle and foot meet. It may also affect other joints nearby.

If you are experiencing foot pain due to arthritis, schedule an appointment at our office. At Family Foot Care, we will carefully examine your feet and evaluate your symptoms to better understand your condition.

By Family Foot Care
June 09, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Untagged

An ingrown toenail occurs when the nail curves sideways into the skin alongside the nail. This can cause pain, especially when wearing tight shoes. It can also lead to an infection with redness and swelling.

The side of the nail will need to be removed in order to stop the pain and release any infection present. If there is a lot of redness and swelling, then an antibotic may also be used. The redness and pain should begin to go away within 48 hours. It will take about two weeks for the exposed nail bed to become dry and all the swelling to go down.

If only the side of the nail was removed it will begin to grow back in a few months. To prevent recurrence, that side of the nail bed may be treated with a strong chemical to prevent the nail from regrowing.

 

 

By Family Foot Care
May 22, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Untagged

Degenerative joint disease (arthritis) often occurs in the joint of a big toe. This bone growth may cause pain and stiffness in the joint. Left untreated, arthritis can break down the cartilage and destroy the joint. Your treatment options depend on how damaged your joint is. There are many non-surgical treatments, but if these are not helpful, surgery may be considered. 





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